Friday Stream of Consciousness – 83

stream of consciousness

Here are some things on my mind this Friday morning: My brain works best with a lot of information flying at it. I’m not the kind of person who has great ideas sitting in the desert or on a beach with mind wandering. But, the shower–I’ve come up with some great ideas in there. And […]

Don’t Be “Real” or “Serious”

approval of others

One enemy of things creative, relevant, and breakthrough is they often come from those considered not to be “real” or “serious” at this or that.

Seth Godin writes:

“As in, ‘that’s not a real football team, they don’t play in Division 1′ or ‘That stock isn’t traded on a real exchange’ or ‘Your degree isn’t from a real school.’

Real contains all sorts of normative assumptions and implicit criticisms for those that don’t qualify. Real is just one way to reject the weird.

My problem with the search for the badge of real is that it trades your goals and your happiness for someone else’s.’”

This is true in the church world. “He’s not a ‘serious’ scholar.” “That’s not ‘real’ growth.” “She’s not a ‘serious’ minister.” “That’s not a ‘real’ worship song.” Real schmeal.

New Release – Breaking Through Imaginative Gridlock

Breaking Through Imaginative Gridlock - Tim Spivey

I’m pleased to announce the release of a new leadership experience I’ve authored, Breaking Through Imaginative Gridlock: Asking Better/Different Questions to Get Breakthrough Ideas, in partnership with Leadership Network through the app Leadia.

Leadia is a mobile app from Leadership Network that combines concise innovative ideas, dynamic embedded media, and integrated social networking. It includes nearly 10,000 words of text, several short teaching videos, and the ability to interact with other readers via social media. Learn more about Leadia by clicking here.

I created this Leadia experience to help those suffering the ministry equivalent of “writer’s block.” I believe some ideas with the greatest potential to help the Kingdom advance can come from those who don’t consider themselves very imaginative, but even the most “creative” among us will need to break through imaginative gridlock at some point. My hope is this leadership experience can be a step forward in that process.

Here are some excerpts: