Story Telling

At night, when I put Anna and Olivia to bed, they always ask me to tell them a Bible story. I then respond, "Which one?" Then, they give me the story that they are into at a given time. Anna is into Jacob and Esau. Olivia is into Daniel and the Lion's Den and Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego.

I haven't had the guts to tell them the story I loved the most growing up–Ahab and Jezebel…which ends affectionately, "And the dogs licked up her blood." A bit morbid, but I loved that story as a kid.

It was all in how it was told. The difference between a mundane telling of a story and a great telling of a story is huge. People still like to hear a good story told, even in the age of lights, smokepots, ubertechnology, and razzle dazzle.

Reading and hearing Fred Craddock, Anne Lamott and people who are masters at casual storytelling may not have made me a good storyteller, but it surely heightened my appreciation for the art form, and made me want to be a good storyteller…and it's lots of fun.

Dr. Tim Spivey is Lead Planter of New Vintage Church in San Diego, California. He is the author of numerous articles and one book, "Jesus: The Powerful Servant." A sought after speaker for events, Tim also serves as Adjunct Professor of Religion at Pepperdine University. Tim serves as a church consultant, and his writings are featured on ChurchLeaders.com, Church Executive magazine, Faith Village, Sermon Central, and Giving Rocket.

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