Softball and Balance

Softball
Highland Oaks has 4 softball teams that play on Monday nights. They range in skill level from the unbeatable to those who just love the Lord and like to hit things with bats.

I play left field, and that means that I run around a lot and wake up sore every Tuesday morning, though I do my best to stay in shape. I guess it’s because I use muscles that I only use when I play softball. I can’t work them out in the gym or by jogging…only softball can get them.

For the same reason we must seek balance in the spiritual life.

I have always gravitated toward the study of Scripture and worship. Prayer (in it’s conventional form) is something that I’ve had to work at over the years. But, when my prayer life sags, the spiritual muscles that prayer develops begin to atrophy.

Approaches to ecclesiology or spirituality that do not seek wholeness, balance, or "wellroundedness" ultimately lead to malformed Bodies. We shouldn’t, for example, surrender the contemplative life in order to correct the church’s shortcomings in the area of service to the poor. We should simply strive to be more compassionate in heart and action. This is supported by, not hindered by, contemplative life with God. In all things, we seek for God to make us whole, and more like Jesus everyday. For some, this will mean more action. For some, more contemplation. For others, it will mean engaging the mind more. For others, it will mean engaging the marginalized more through redemptive action. For others, it may be working to rid their lives of various idols.

It is true that God has created all of us with spiritual gifts and passions that are a reflection of God’s character. Some spiritual practices will be more natural to us than others. But, balance in one’s spiritual life desirable. We build on things that come most naturally to us toward things that will make us stronger, more fully mature disciples.

 

Dr. Tim Spivey is Lead Planter of New Vintage Church in San Diego, California. He is the author of numerous articles and one book, "Jesus: The Powerful Servant." A sought after speaker for events, Tim also serves as Adjunct Professor of Religion at Pepperdine University. Tim serves as a church consultant, and his writings are featured on ChurchLeaders.com, Church Executive magazine, Faith Village, Sermon Central, and Giving Rocket.

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