How to Pray for Your Pastor

prayer How to Pray for Your Pastor

Having God’s people praying for me is one of the greatest blessings in my life. The Scriptures teach the prayer of the righteous is powerful and effective, and I hope someday God will grant me the opportunity to see how the prayers of His people strengthened my life and ministry.

If you don’t already do so, I’d like to encourage you to start doing so on a regular basis–at least weekly. Praying for your minister is one of the most simple but valuable ways you can bless your church. It will bless your life as well.

Some might ask, what specifically should I pray for? Good question. I’ve suggested a prayer list for pastors that I hope is fairly comprehensive, yet doesn’t require massive amounts of time to work through. You can print it out, or cut and paste the text into a format of your choice. I pray for many of my friends of ministry using this list.

For Spiritual Well-Being. Protect them from the evil one. Grant a deep thirst for personal holiness and a deepening walk with Christ. Bless them with true friends they can confess to, who will speak truth into their life while loving them as Christ would.

Emotional Health. Keep their hearts from being discouraged. Give them skin thick enough to fight off discouragement but thin enough to be sensitive to those in need. Give them confidence that God is working mightily through them without giving into pride.

Family Life. Thank God for their spouses and children. Ask God to strengthen their marriages. Give them good friends they can have fun with as a couple. Pray that God would provide for their family financially and the church would love their family as their family loves the church.

Excellence in Ministry. Ask God to fan into flame the gifts His Spirit has provided them. Ask God to rekindle their love for ministry every day. Ask God to grant wisdom in making decisions, passion for the Lost, and clarity of vision. Ask God to instill in them a work ethic that honors Him without dishonoring Him through workaholism.

There is one last step here: tell God you’re willing to serve as conduit for His answering of these prayers. Consider working through this list and looking for ways you can help make these prayers a reality with God’s help. I’ve found over the years that I can often play a part in God’s answer to the prayers I’ve offered.

When we read the book of Acts we see a praying church, and we see and active and powerful Holy Spirit who responds to those prayers. We should never, ever, ever underestimate the power of prayer. Because, to do so is to underestimate the power of God in life of the Church.

I’d love to hear how you pray for your ministers, and what we could add to the list above? Pastors, jump in here as well.

(note: this post is adapted from a prior post)

 

Dr. Tim Spivey is Lead Planter of New Vintage Church in San Diego, California. He is the author of numerous articles and one book, "Jesus: The Powerful Servant." A sought after speaker for events, Tim also serves as Adjunct Professor of Religion at Pepperdine University. Tim serves as a church consultant, and his writings are featured on ChurchLeaders.com, Church Executive magazine, Faith Village, Sermon Central, and Giving Rocket.

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

Share Your Thoughts

5 thoughts on “How to Pray for Your Pastor

  1. I agree with the need pastors have for prayer. However, I always feel like the prayer singles me out and apart from the community. As if they view me as a hired gun who is here for a year or two and will move on. Am I alone in this feeling? Are there ways to pray and include as apart of the community?

    • Jeffrey, that’s a very, very, interesting comment. I would hope no church actually views you as a temporary hired gun–but that it may come across that way in it’s prayer. However, it’s certainly possible.

      I would think some teaching or mentioning on the matter might help some, or using “we” language at nearly all times might, as well. I don’t know your spiritual background, but in my own, the problem is more the opposite of the one you describe.

      Great comment, Jeffrey.