Friday Stream of Consciousness – 65

Stream of Consciousness Friday Stream of Consciousness   65

Here are some things on my mind this Friday morning:

  • January 22nd was the 40th year of Roe vs. Wade. Justin Taylor wrote a fantastic blog post entitled, “5 Things You Didn’t Know About Jane Roe.” Her name, for instance, isn’t Jane Roe. Today, she is a pro-life advocate. Click here to read.
  • Jose Mujica, President of Uruguay, is the world’s poorest President. He gives away 90% of his income and lives in a farmhouse. People have mixed reviews on him. I’ve embedded a BBC video on him below.

  • It sounds like Kobe Bryant squared up on Dwight Howard in a players only meeting. As an athlete, I was involved in 2 of those. It usually means the team has run out of all other options. Dwight Howard has supposedly apologized for his attitude. However, I can’t get away from thinking just 2 years ago he was Superman in the dunk contest and one of the most popular athletes on earth. Now, he’s almost unpopular–all because of attitude. Attitude really is important, isn’t it?
  • I talked in yesterday’s post about my struggle with our nation sending our daughters to the battlefield. It went out later in the day. If you missed it, I hope you’ll join the conversation.
  • Mark Driscoll’s inauguration tweet set off a firestorm. In case you missed it, during the inauguration, he tweeted, “Praying for our president, who today will place his hand on a Bible he does not believe to take an oath to a God he likely does not know.” Ouch. Those who criticized Mark Driscoll said it was “unChristian” of him to do so. I had a problem with the tact and tone of judgmentalism. However, when did it not become OK for a Christian to be critical of a nation’s leader? John the Baptist did it, as did the prophets–often in quite jagged fashion. I also don’t recall an outcry from these defenders of the President during the Bush presidency–when he was called a murderer and war criminal by certain “evangelicals.” Mark Driscoll shouldn’t have sent the tweet, and He should be careful judging others. But, my problem with the tweet isn’t because Christians should always be nice to the President. That’s extrabiblical–at best, a faint echo of passages that ask us to submit or pray for those in authority. Driscoll said he was praying in the tweet, and isn’t an anarchist as far as I know. I’m not defending Mark Driscoll. I’m defending the prophetic voice, which stands apart from rulers when they oppress, sin, or offend God. Whether or not that’s what Mark Driscoll was doing, I leave to you.
  • If you’ve been in the church for any length of time, I encourage you to pick up Larry Osborne’s, Accidental Pharisees.
  • I’ve seen the film previews for Kerouac’s, On the Road, and Fitzgerald’s, The Great Gatsby. Those are two dark books that are absolutely brilliant. They won’t pick you up, but they will make you think and feel. Also, Leonardo DiCaprio as Gatsby was an excellent choice by casting.
  • I had the worst pick in the 10-and-under girls softball draft, but feel good about our team.
  • One of the best things about living in Escondido is the plethora of random hole-in-the-wall Mexican food restaurants. Nearly all of them have good salsa, and specialize in something grubbalicious.

What’s on your mind this Friday morning? Care to respond to anything above?

Dr. Tim Spivey is Lead Planter of New Vintage Church in San Diego, California. He is the author of numerous articles and one book, "Jesus: The Powerful Servant." A sought after speaker for events, Tim also serves as Adjunct Professor of Religion at Pepperdine University. Tim serves as a church consultant, and his writings are featured on ChurchLeaders.com, Church Executive magazine, Faith Village, Sermon Central, and Giving Rocket.

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3 thoughts on “Friday Stream of Consciousness – 65

  1. I agree. To use Mark Driscoll as an example of biblical prophetic witness is like using Rush Limbaugh as an example of responsible political commentary.

  2. The problem wasn’t being generally critical of the president. The problem was the arrogance with which he declared that Obama doesn’t believe the Bible and doesn’t know God. As a Christian leader with a large audience, Driscoll has a responsibility to represent Christ in an honorable way. What he wrote was shameful and not at all constructive, which has been his m.o. for a while now. A simple “praying for our President” without the judgmental jab would have been honorable, Biblical, and sufficient.